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Master of None’s Eric Wareheim is a Master of Wine

In Film, Pie Hole, The Menuby Danny BrodyLeave a Comment

Eric Wareheim is a funny fucking guy. His gangly, goofy looks have propelled his comic adventures into SpaceX territory on groundbreaking shows like “Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job!”, while his endearing kookiness has helped make season two of “Master of None”, Aziz Ansari’s Netflix hit, an absurdist journey of deranged sanity and brolicious indulgence. Wareheim is truly silly, …

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Last Chance: Emilio Cavallini’s Objectual Abstractions in Washington D.C

In The Menu, Visual Artsby Eva ZanardiLeave a Comment

It was an early summer day in Washington D.C. and the air was perfumed with the sweet scent emitted from globes of white, fragrant flowers popping out on the branches, trees, and balconies of Georgetown’s grand homes. Yet another variety of abstract, flower-like wall sculptures were “blooming” and filling the Capital with colors and kinetic energy: Emilio Cavallini’s dynamic works, …

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Unknown Horizon, The Art of Kelly Berg, Craig Krull Gallery

In The Menu, Visual Artsby Quiet LunchLeave a Comment

Kelly Berg creates dense textural compositions while playing with the dichotomies of flat vs sculptural space. The extreme energy embodied in her work gives the viewer the sense that her paintings emerge from both internal and external forces that lie just beyond the artist’s own conscious control. Kelly Berg’s current solo show, called Unknown Horizon, at Craig Krull Gallery Santa …

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Jean Pierre Roy: The Art of Corralling Perception or The Artist as the Original Neuroscientist

In The Menu, Visual Artsby Eva ZanardiLeave a Comment

Warning: by reading this article you will expand your vocabulary and learn about neuroscience -I know I did when I wrote it! Should you find yourself in doubt when reading, please check the links. Enjoy! “There are things known and there are things unknown, and in between are the doors of perception.” –Aldous Huxley It’s a chilly mid-April afternoon in …

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HBO’s Fahrenheit 451 is All Smoke With No Fire

In Crumbs, Film, Literatureby Alcy LeyvaLeave a Comment

There was a moment during the HBO film adaptation of the Ray Bradbury classic Fahrenheit 451 that I audibly groaned. Up until that point, I had been enjoying seeing the establishment of this dystopia and the struggle of it’s characters come to grips with its oppressiveness. There was subtle social commentary sprinkled here and there, and I enjoyed connecting the …

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POSEN’S THREADS – A Process of Drawing

In The Menu, Visual Artsby L. Brandon KrallLeave a Comment

“Think of Stephen Posen as Theseus paying out his line, traversing his labyrinth knowing and not knowing what awaits him. Perhaps Posen shares Paul Klee’s ambition of 1908 “to note experiences which could translate themselves into line even in absolute darkness.” The tacit question is: can a line still be fictive – that is to say, imaginative – in a …

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Andy Mister Ascends With “New Dawn Fades” At TURN GALLERY

In The Menu, Visual Artsby Kurt McVeyLeave a Comment

There’s nothing overtly didactic about 39-year-old artist Andy Mister’s solo show at TURN Gallery, New Dawn Fades. There are, however, 11 painstaking works on display featuring roughly the same number of representational images, each deftly rendered in incredible detail on monochrome paper using carbon pencil, charcoal and acrylic. The recent passing of Tom Wolfe, an at times controversial literary giant, …

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Sex and the City Isn’t As Irrelevant As Its Current Detractors (Sarah Jessica Parker Included) Are Making It Out to Be

In Film, The Menuby Genna RivieccioLeave a Comment

As even Sarah Jessica Parker cowers to the juggernaut of gender fluidity and racial inclusivity that has rendered all pop culture offerings of the past utterly obsolete, one can’t deny that there are still many beacons of truth contained within the show that made daft white girls everywhere want to move to New York. And yes, Carrie Bradshaw (Parker) was the …

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Sara Driver: For Real

In Film, The Menu, Visual Artsby Jennifer ParkerLeave a Comment

Sara Driver is one of the most relevant and underappreciated filmmakers of a generation. Take Boom For Real: The Late Teenage Years of Jean-Michel Basquiat, her documentary piecing together the life of an artist and friend before he became famous. Driver who has witnessed decay and regrowth in New York City since being a grad student at NYU circa Jim …

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Liu Bolin X Ruinart at Frieze New York

In The Menu, Visual Artsby Paul LasterLeave a Comment

Known as the Invisible Man, Chinese artist Liu Bolin is the latest contemporary artist to be commissioned by the House of Ruinart to collaborate on a creative project for the art world’s favorite champagne. Featured at art fairs around the world, Ruinart has a long history of working with artists and designers in residence to annually create a project that …

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The FRIEZE Phenomenon New York 2018

In The Menu, Visual Artsby L. Brandon KrallLeave a Comment

One arrives at the North or South entrance to FRIEZE, and once past security has the immediate sensation of light-soaked space in airy white tents, where walls sparely installed with wonderful artworks are high planes that seem to stand without support. While this spacial euphoria may be lost fairly quickly when one begins to circumambulate the color-coded divisions of the …

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East End Collected4

In The Menu, Visual Artsby Quiet LunchLeave a Comment

On Saturday, March 31 the Southampton Arts Center opened its fourth East End Collected exhibition (East End Collected4). Artist Paton Miller has curated the exhibit since its inception six years ago. Mr. Miller, who had been approached by then-mayor Mark Epley, suggested showcasing the work of East End artists, borrowed from collectors. As a prelude to reopening the space that …

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Frieze NY 2018 Highlight: Gert and Uwe Tobias at Rodolphe Janssen

In The Menu, Visual Artsby Quiet LunchLeave a Comment

A delightful highlight of Frieze NY this year is the french-blue painted booth by Rodolphe Janssen. Following suit in a series of twin artist collaborations like Doug and Mike Starn and Os Gemeos are works by identical twin brothers Gert + Uwe Tobias. Humming with the freshness of spring, fairy tale-inspired ceramics and woodcuts on canvas bloom in different sizes …

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A Bird’s Eye View of FRIEZE New York

In The Menu, Visual Artsby L. Brandon KrallLeave a Comment

FREIZE New York ran for 5 days from Tuesday the 2nd through Sunday the 6th of May. The fair was founded in London in 2003 as a philanthropic project to promote contemporary art, an offshoot of the eponymous magazine, it has taken place annually in London in October. In 2012 FREIZE New York was opened in “bespoke” white tent structures, …

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Darkness on the Edge of Town, a Frieze Recap

In The Menu, Visual Artsby Danny BrodyLeave a Comment

Highlight of the Day! Won’t you join me in the Pettibon Zone? (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Nudes! Nudes! Nudes! (Ladies Edition) Richard Diebenkorn, Untitled (Reclining Figure), 1966/George Condo, Showgirl, 2008/Joan Semmel, Double Take, 1991 Jordan Nassar’s Embroidery Installation at Anat Ebgi Gallery I want artwork that reflects ME. Literally! This fair is making me hungry. Is that toast? Somebody …

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I Came, I Went, I Came Again! Frieze Flutters and The Uncle Jerry Show

In The Menu, Visual Artsby Danny BrodyLeave a Comment

Nothing is free in life, in the end you pay for your pleasure with pain, heartache, and decay. Consider the art fair, a dinosaur whose fossil was unearthed and resurrected, Jurassic Park-like, on Randall’s Island this week, and whose lumbering stride threatens to trample everything that fails to hightail it out of its path. So come, go, and come again …

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Best Booth at Frieze New York: Bill Beckley, the Eighties, Albertz Benda Gallery Booth SP21

In The Menu, Visual Artsby Gregory De La HabaLeave a Comment

Chelsea gallery, Albertz Benda featured a stunning exhibition of works by the American artist (and poet as we see it), Bill Beckley. A teacher at SVA and trailblazer who, many years ago, organized the first exhibition at the legendary 112 Greene Street Workshop in SoHo in 1972 with Gordon Matta Clark, Rafi Ferrer, Barry Le Va, Jeffery Lew, Bill Bollinger, and Alan Saret. Beckley’s …

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Worst of List, Day 1, Frieze, New York

In The Menu, Visual Artsby Gregory De La HabaLeave a Comment

Randalls Island, New York—Quiet Lunch hit Frieze hard yesterday. And for the most part, loved every second. Except when we were sweating our fucking balls off the entire time because the AC wasn’t fuctioning. We also hated the new design layout of their massive tents. Why did they change on the previous year’s awesome design where the air, light and …

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Mel Frank: When We Were Criminals

In The Menu, Visual Artsby Kurt McVeyLeave a Comment

“My method of intake is smoking a joint that I rolled,” says Mel Frank, the super-chill, 73-year-old ‘godfather of marijuana growers’ over the phone from his home in Los Angeles. “I like to roll myself because I know what I’m smoking. When you smoke a joint you get the full effects; the taste, the fragrance.” Mel Frank is not the man-the …

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Tribeca: It Wasn’t only a Film Festival

In Film, The Menu, Visual Artsby Jennifer ParkerLeave a Comment

Driver Ed (the first three episodes now streaming on Vimeo – less than a ten-minute commitment) is a woke variation on witty web programming in the age of content overload. Ed is an all but agoraphobic introvert borderline recluse who has been in an online relationship for two years with the girl of his dreams who he’s about to meet …

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NSFW: The End Of Love by Rebecca Leveille at The Untitled Space

In NFSW, The Menu, Visual Artsby Kurt McVeyLeave a Comment

“Things we perceive to be ideals are often built upon faulty, weak and diseased foundations set forward and reinforced by society and pop culture. We are made to fall in love with an arbitrary set of stereotypes, physical ideals or cultural goals that are twisted and often deeply damaging to us……what happens once we cross to the other side of …

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Superfine! NYC Is Keeping It Real

In Visual Artsby Kurt McVeyLeave a Comment

There will be no metaphorical free lunches at this year’s Superfine! NYC, Alex Mitow and his partner, photographer James Miille’s fun and highly approachable art fair, which opens May 2nd in Manhattan’s Meatpacking District. “After being involved with art fairs for about five years, I’m sick of the, ‘It’s going to bring a lot of people’ thing,” says the fast-talking, …

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Ocean Art Week | Meta Gallery, Monaco

In The Menu, Visual Artsby Gregory De La HabaLeave a Comment

“The sea, once it casts its spell, holds one in its net of wonder forever.” -Jacques Yves Cousteau MONACO—The world-renowned French naval officer, explorer, conservationist, scientist, author, inventor, photographer and legendary seafarer was protecting our oceans long before others had realized just how important it is to do so. It was Jacques Cousteau, in his iconic, red-wool hat, who reminded us …

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5 Things We Learned From the Westworld Season 2 Premiere (And 3 Things We Didn’t)

In Film, Marry + Screw + Killby Alcy LeyvaLeave a Comment

Sunday night was the premiere of “Journey Into the Night”- the first episode of the HBO hit show Westworld’s second season. The show’s writers (Jonathan Nolan, Lisa Joy, and Halley Wegryn Gross) spent the better part of 2016 crafting an extremely tight story throughout the span of the first season. Weaving its characters through the vicious and violent world of …

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Tribeca Film Festival: Docs to Watch

In Filmby Jennifer ParkerLeave a Comment

Tribeca is probably one of the most curated film festivals in the best of ways for everyone but cinephiles who have to make a decision about how to be two places at once. For documentary junkies, you might as well put a blindfold on, spin around three times and pin a tail on the schedule. There are too many stand-outs …

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Don’t Pass Over Pass Over

In Filmby Jennifer ParkerLeave a Comment

What do you get when you combine Waiting for Godot, current American race issues, and Biblical lore into a narrative that’s at times hilarious, suspenseful and quirky? You get Antoinette Nwandu’s Pass Over, produced in 2017 by Chicago’s Steppenwolf Theatre and directed by Spike Lee. The direction delivers the intensity of Nwandu’s play—given life by actors Julian Parker and Jon …

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Allison Zuckerman: Sky’s The Limit

In Visual Artsby Kurt McVeyLeave a Comment

The young painter, no, the remixed-media collage artist or better yet, the hyper-meta art cannon image sampler, Allison Zuckerman, who experienced a wild, meteoric rise in the contemporary art world over the last year and a half, is ready to embark on the next and sure to be exciting chapter of her life and career. Last week, just one day …

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Negotiating with Nature. (Film Review)

In Crumbs, Film, The Actual Factualby Genna RivieccioLeave a Comment

Negotiating with Nature fully captures today’s main issue: mankind’s current Weltanschauung clashes with the way nature works. Filmmaker Stefan van Norden has the lyrical objectivity and open-minded poetry to lead audiences through a narrative of awakening. This suave documentary is an ode to nature and a call to action for the natural environment’s renewal and survival of all living beings. …

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Alfred Hitchcock meets Edward Hopper in 3D

In Visual Artsby L. Brandon KrallLeave a Comment

Susan Leopold has been mesmerizing her audience with miniature visions of rooms and architectural spaces for decades. Intersections is a show of recent works, illuminated box constructions present dreamlike interiors conveying recollections of places commonly used. An attic, a backroom, a rehearsal space that is also used for weekly worship. Inspiration comes from places Leopold notices for their commonality, and …

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Last Chance: The Orchid Show at The New York Botanical Garden, Through Sunday April 22, 2018

In Visual Artsby Eva ZanardiLeave a Comment

THE ORCHID SHOW Saturday, March 3, 2018 – Sunday, April 22, 2018 at The New York Botanical Garden Installations by Belgian Floral Artist Daniel Ost The long, chilly winter might not have brought much snow this year, but it’s a safe bet that everyone’s ready for some horticultural eye candy. Luckily, the New York Botanical Garden’s annual Orchid Show is …

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“Tough Love” in The Bronx

In The Menu, Visual Artsby Danny BrodyLeave a Comment

“The Bronx used to mean, ‘be careful’,” said John ‘CRASH’ Matos, owner of the gallery, Wallworks, in the South Bronx. “If you were born and raised in the Bronx, and you were anywhere in the world, people would look at you, like, hmm, with a little hesitation. But it’s a special place.” Matos was a seminal figure in the New …

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Naama Tsabar Stages a Rockin’ Feminist Performative Intervention for The Guggenheim’s 2018 Young Collectors Party

In The Menu, Visual Artsby Kurt McVeyLeave a Comment

It’s been well documented in the annals of Rock lore, that in the winter of 1970, Led Zeppelin holed up in Headley Grange, an ivy-clad poorhouse in Hampshire, England to record the majority of their fourth album (LZ IV), which went 23x Platinum, features “Stairway to Heaven,” and is considered one of the greatest albums ever made. Other bands in …

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Masterpieces Skateboard Show | Art on A Gallery

In The Menu, Visual Artsby Gregory De La HabaLeave a Comment

Quiet Lunch visited Rafael Colon’s ‘Masterpieces’ on Skateboards show at Art on A Gallery this week. A New York native and former Marine, Rafael Colon breaths new life into the Old Masters.  Famous works by Michaelangelo, Edgar Degas, Gustav Klimt, and Vincent Van Gogh to name but a  few, are painted by Mr. Colon on wooden skateboards. But if you …

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East End Collected 4 | Southampton Arts Center

In The Menu, Visual Artsby Quiet LunchLeave a Comment

Quiet Lunch hit the Hamptons this week for the season’s much anticipated and lauded exhibition series, East End Collected, curated by renowned painter, Paton Miller. This, the fourth incarnation of EEC, opened to a full house at the Southampton Arts Center on Jobs Lane and former home to the Parrish Art Museum. The exhibition reflects on Mr. Miller’s vision of …

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Ready Player One: The Modern Day Coin-Op

In Crumbs, Filmby Alcy LeyvaLeave a Comment

As you can tell from my reviews for Pacific Rim: Uprising and A Wrinkle In Time, films which use nostalgia or adaptations of popular kid’s books can be a double-edged sword. On one hand, you have the happy thoughts and all of the warmth that comes along with a trip down memory lane. On the other, you have the realization that …

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The Colors of Jen Stark

In The Menu, Visual Artsby Danny BrodyLeave a Comment

As one slips slides and careens in and out and down the rabbit-hole of LA artist Jen Stark’s hallucinogenic work, one is reminded of Alice in Wonderland’s fall into that almost never-ending burrow. “Either the well was very deep, or she fell very slowly, for she had plenty of time to look about.” And like Alice, who grabs onto objects, …

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Listiography: Egg Hunting in Ready Player One

In Film, Marry + Screw + Killby Alcy LeyvaLeave a Comment

This weekend, audiences are lining up to watch the Steven Spielberg directed adaptation of Ernest Cline’s nostalgia-fest Ready Player One. There’s a lot to love here. With Spielberg at the helm and Cline co-writing, the film might be one of the few film adaptations to stick the landing. While I’m busy writing up the film and chopping it up into …