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Where Homage Meets Understanding: What Pacific Rim: Uprising Gets Wrong

In Film, Marry + Screw + Kill by Alcy LeyvaLeave a Comment

There’s a moment in the third act of Pacific Rim: Uprising (2018, dir. Stevens DeKnight), right in the middle of its thunderous final battle, where a character runs by a giant mecha statue right in the heart of a Tokyo. This moment single-handedly ruined the whole movie for me. Yes, I had already been engaged by its metal munching, monster-crunching …

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Robert Filliou, Seule la Fête est Permanente: Works 1962-1984

In Visual Arts by L. Brandon KrallLeave a Comment

Seule la Fête est Permanente, is a phrase that the artist gives in English as, “The Eternal Network is Everlasting” but in French it carries several additional readings including, only the party is permanent, or, alone the celebration continues… Filliou with the artist George Brecht, ran a collaborative space for three years, a “Center for Permanent Creation” in Villefranche-sur-Mer, a …

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Surveying Zoe Leonard @ the Whitney

In Visual Arts by L. Brandon KrallLeave a Comment

The appearance of simplicity in this mid-career installation is a relief from the plethora of overtly expressionistic, mercilessly overwrought libidinal and self centered work that is choking gallery and museum exhibits these days. The exhibition travels to the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art and it is by no means ‘understated’ the Leonard exhibition creates a subtle field for encounter …

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The Case for The Neurotic Quest for Serenity

In Film by Jennifer ParkerLeave a Comment

Imagine you’re a “medium-pretty” actress who is always worried about losing her role to another actress, not hard, right? Turn that worry into a full-blown, post-apocalyptic, Mad Max- like reoccurring nightmare complete with costumes and stunt people and you begin to understand the depth of Kika’s anxiety. In her non-dream life, she is being stalked by a super-fan, Filipão. She’s …

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Prizefighter

In Visual Arts by Danny BrodyLeave a Comment

A chill, late November rain falls on a dark cobblestone street in New York City’s fashionable Meatpacking District, where the Renzo Piano-designed Whitney Museum dominates, a glittering symbol of the moneyed art world’s move downtown. Less than two blocks away, outside the aptly-named Ft. Gansevoort, an art gallery on the beachhead of some of New York’s most exclusive real estate, …

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Robert Lobe + Nature

In Visual Arts by L. Brandon KrallLeave a Comment

Robert Lobe’s recent sculptures are “like field reports from adventures of discovery in a forest lab doubling as studio, canvas and text.” Lobe is committed to a practice that requires his being in nature, walking and hiking in the woods and mountains. Lobe seeks certain combinations of trees and rocks that inspire him. The relation between a growing tree and …

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Outside Art: Alok Vaid-Menon in Chicago

In The Menu, Visual Arts by Benjamin Van LoonLeave a Comment

Alok Vaid-Menon is an artist. Alok Vaid-Menon is not an artist. Alok Vaid-Menon is an artist. Alok Vaid-Menon is not an artist. Alok (they/them), a gender non-conforming performance artist and writer, sometimes uses breathless repetition in their monologues to underscore important points. Sometimes these monologues go on for 30 minutes straight, without symmetry, arc, or pause. Sometimes these monologues have …

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DAVID BOWIE IS @ The Brooklyn Museum

In Visual Arts by L. Brandon KrallLeave a Comment

What can anybody say but that David Bowie is a phenomenon. While Blockbuster shows are now a regular feature for museum goers, the exhibition devoted to David Bowie @ the Brooklyn Museum is an intense, immersive and very advanced last stop in an eleven venue trajectory that began in 2013 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the V&A. Visitors …

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Just A Wrinkle: Why Disney’s Newest Adaptation Shows the Flaws of Bringing Classics to Theaters

In Film, Marry + Screw + Kill, The Actual Factual by Alcy LeyvaLeave a Comment

When it was announced that Disney was finally bringing a film adaptation of bring the beloved classic “A Wrinkle in Time” to the big screen, fans rejoiced. Adding Ava DuVernay (director of the 2015 film Selma) to the fold as the director seemed liked icing on the cake. With DuVernay’s eye and a Disney budget, it was safe to bank …

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Filipino Painter Jigger Cruz Offers a Picture Towards the Other Side

In Visual Arts by Kurt McVeyLeave a Comment

The young Filipino artist Jigger Cruz uses the word “playful” a lot during our brief conversation Thursday night inside Chelsea’s Albertz Benda Gallery. Cruz was celebrating his first solo exhibition in the United States, Picture Towards the Other Side.  “Chaotic” is another word that comes up frequently during the conversation. It becomes clear that these two words-playful and chaotic-are the …

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The Best of Volta, Independent, and Scope 2018

In Visual Arts by Eva ZanardiLeave a Comment

Wow, it seems like eons ago, but it was only last week when I wondered from art fair to art fair, furiously focused, miraculously ubiquitous, my toes bloody murder. With the Armory week’s circus completed, one can’t help but feeling kind of like an art orphan wondering, now what (oh wait a minute, Asia Art week is here!) After the …

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Leaning into the Wind

In Film by Jennifer ParkerLeave a Comment

There are more than a few ways to go about making a documentary about an artist. There’s the dead artist documentary, the living artist documentary and what he (and maybe every once in a while, she) has done thus far with his life—either pre-success or post and then there’s the slice-of-life look. The beauty of the latter is that context …

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About The Kiss

In Visual Arts by L. Brandon KrallLeave a Comment

Kiss Off is an exhibition about kissing that just opened on the upper east side at the Luxembourg & Dayan Gallery, 64 East 77th Street just off Madison Avenue. The museum quality of exhibitions at this gallery, which has a branch in London, is impressive. While the spaces are not grand by industrial standards they are comfortable, consummately installed and have …

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Armory Show for Eva – Piers 92 & 94 – March 8-11, 2018, New York 

In Visual Arts by Eva ZanardiLeave a Comment

Armory Show – Piers 92 & 94- March 8-11, 2018, New York Ciao Manhattan! It’s the most wonderful time of the year (for contemporary and modern art junkies)! As winter storm Quinn hammers the Northeast with heavy snow, Manhattan looks like a Victorian snow globe version of a miniature Gotham City. It almost feels like Christmas, but we are in early March and it’s the VIP preview Day for the Armory Show, New York’s …

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Gordon Parks: I AM YOU (Parts 1 and 2)

In Visual Arts by L. Brandon KrallLeave a Comment

What I want. What I am. What you force me to be is what you are. For I am you staring back from a mirror of poverty and despair, of revolt and freedom. Look at me and know that to destroy me is to destroy yourself. Born in 1912 in rural Kansas, Gordon Parks and his siblings were orphaned when …

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Danh Vo: Take My Breath Away

In Visual Arts by L. Brandon KrallLeave a Comment

Vietnamese-Danish artist Danh Vo (pronounced ‘Yan’) opened the Guggenheim museum’s skylight to allow direct sunlight to come in. The light from the oculus falls through the building and nurtures a selection of semi-tropical plants that are dispersed throughout the building and on the ground floor by the eye shaped pool. Some are placed in the spiral ramps in Mexican pottery …

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Dan Flavin: in daylight or cool white

In Visual Arts by L. Brandon KrallLeave a Comment

Dan Flavin: in daylight or cool white February 24th – April 14th @ David Zwirner, 537 West 20th Street, New York The brilliance of this work is in Flavin’s permutational use of light itself. His process took a long time to mature over a period of many years before he finally discovered his formal language. In an autobiographical text published …

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Slow Motion with Charlie Rubin & Michael Chandler

In Visual Arts by Kurt McVeyLeave a Comment

On Thursday, March 1st, at the roughly year-old John Doe Gallery in Brooklyn, the Bronx-born multi-media artist Charlie Rubin and the long-time New York painter Michael Chandler joined forces for a joint exhibition they’re calling Slow Motion. Before getting into the work, the name of the gallery deserves some careful explanation. Grace Noh, John Doe’s Curator-who sat in during the …

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Climb by Rachel Hornaday Opening Exhibition | Art at the Yard (Photo Recap)

In The Menu, Visual Arts by Quiet LunchLeave a Comment

Thanks to everyone you stopped by the opening exhibition of Climb by Rachel Hornaday at the Yard. Here is a photo recap of the festivities. Quiet LunchQuiet Lunch is a grassroot online publication that seeks to promote various aspects of life and culture with a loving, but brute, educational tinge. When we say, “Creative Sustenance Daily,” we mean it. https://quietlunch.com

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Vieno James | Artist of the Black Sun

In Film by Jennifer ParkerLeave a Comment

New York-based artist Vieno James exudes a raw sensuality that mirrors the art he makes and the materials he utilizes in his work. Juxtaposing stucco framing against the silks and other fabrics Vieno procured from his travels to Italy, Kuwait, and Egypt, he blurs the line between painting and sculpture. There’s a calmness, physicality, and hint of theater to James’ …

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Iron Gate East Launch Party | Inaugural Show: Ghosts of the Inanimate

In The Menu, Visual Arts by Gregory De La HabaLeave a Comment

SOUTHAMPTON, NEW YORK—A full house was had Saturday evening, February 24th, at The Spur @ Southampton Social Club, the Hampton’s first private co- working space and innovation hub for entrepreneurs. There to launch Kelcey Edwards’ Iron Gate East and the opening reception of Ghosts of the Inanimate featuring works of three, Brooklyn-based artists: Belgian-American artist, Hedwig Brouckaert, American artist, Caleb Freese, and South Korean-American …

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Climb | Rachel Hornaday | Art at The Yard Opening Exhibition

In The Menu, Visual Arts by Quiet LunchLeave a Comment

Climb is an experimental solo exhibition by artist Rachel Hornaday. Featuring paintings on canvas and sculptures of porcelain, Climb stems from the artist’s ever-evolving, material-based dialogue pertaining form and color, between the simple, stark whiteness of raw, ‘naked’ porcelain juxtaposed with abstract landscapes full of undulating color. It is in this space between objects, between polar opposites, between worlds absent of color …

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The Beauty of Culture and Conflict in Marvel’s Black Panther

In Film, Marry + Screw + Kill by Alcy LeyvaLeave a Comment

There were a few moments while watching Black Panther (2018, dir. Ryan Coogler) in which I found myself laughing out loud in the theater, and it wasn’t because there was anything particularly humorous happening on screen. I mostly laughed because I wondered how director Ryan Coogler was able to accomplish something so simple and yet still unheard of during my …

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Industrial Melanism | Neil Grayson | Debut Solo Exhibition Opening Night (Photo Recap)

In Crumbs, The Menu, Visual Arts by Bim StarLeave a Comment

With everything going on right now, NYFW 2018 just ending, some other bowl, awards-awards-awards, I had to make sure that QL stopped by Neil Grayson’s debut solo exhibition, Industrial Melanism at Eykyn Maclean Gallery. The vibe was warm and inviting. The people were chatting, asking and awing. I know how lucky Quiet Lunch is to be able to continue to …

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Jinkies | Velma Dinkley | Antonio Deluca

In Crumbs, The Menu, Visual Arts by Bim StarLeave a Comment

Who doesn’t love fan art & Scooby-Doo? Having a crush on Velma since forever is why I had to post about Antonio Deluca‘s Velma Dinkley illustration. Happy V-Day!? Bim StarThis New York City native breathes the concrete jungle. From be a stylist and clothing designer who’s pieces has graced the silhouettes of fashionistas and socialites alike, to running the streets …

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The Party, Not So Black and White | Film Review

In Film by Jennifer ParkerLeave a Comment

Unpack this: You do look slightly ministerial in that pinny—in a 21st century, post-modern, post, post, feminist sort of way. Says Patricia Clarkson’s character, April to her BFF, Janet, albeit the woman who is about to prove that you can still get your ephemeral feelings in a world of hurt when you find out that your husband has been keeping secrets …

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The Projective Drawing at the Austrian Cultural Forum

In Visual Arts by L. Brandon KrallLeave a Comment

A jewel of the midtown area, the Austrian Cultural Forum is to be found at 52nd Street just off Fifth Avenue; one block from the Museum of Modern Art. Housed in a building designed by architect Raimond Abraham and across the street from Cartier, the exhibition of terrifically inventive and entertaining works on paper ranges across three levels in the …

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Unveiling the Obamas at The National Portrait Gallery

In Visual Arts by L. Brandon KrallLeave a Comment

Barack and Michelle Obama were present at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C. on Monday for the unveiling of their official portraits by Kahinde Wiley and Amy Sherald. Twenty-first century style and poses project the personalities of the Obamas; a relief from traditional presidential portraiture this work does not repeat settings and symbols from the past, but sets the …

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McSorley’s Old Ale House, New York & The Ashcan School

In Crumbs, The Menu, Visual Arts by Gregory De La HabaLeave a Comment

“McSorley sold his ale across the bar at two mugs for a quarter. A tired man could go in, buy his mug, sit down and rest until his weariness passed. It was a meeting-place for artists, writers and musicians of the quieter kind. It was quiet there, and blue clouds of smoke from pipes and cigars were rarely disturbed. Conversation was quiet, earnest …

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Industrial Melanism | Neil Grayson | Debut Solo Exhibition at Ekyan Maclean

In The Menu, Visual Arts by Quiet LunchLeave a Comment

Our latest print edition cover artist Neil Grayson’s debut solo exhibition is going to be amazing. Industrial Melanism, opens tomorrow at Ekyan Maclean at east 67th street from 6 pm – 8 pm. We hope to see you there! Industrial Melanism was the collection Neil presented during our search for the next print cover feature and this collection is why we …

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IG Art of the Week | Philip Lueck | @philiplueck

In The Menu, Visual Arts by Quiet LunchLeave a Comment

IG Art of the Week is “google help” by German digital artist and Illustrator Philip Lueck. Follow @philiplueck Quiet LunchQuiet Lunch is a grassroot online publication that seeks to promote various aspects of life and culture with a loving, but brute, educational tinge. When we say, “Creative Sustenance Daily,” we mean it. https://quietlunch.com

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DECADE | 10 Years at Gallery 151 (Exhibition Recap)

In The Menu, Visual Arts by Quiet LunchLeave a Comment

On December 13th, 2007 Gallery 151’s premiere exhibition, The Wild Style Exhibit, unveiled a collaborative wall of historical graffiti, discovered during the renovation of 151 Wooster Street in Soho. Matthew Namer, the son of the downtown developer Michael Namer, discovered the wall at the same time that renovations were planned to be made to the building. 151 Wooster Street became the first iteration of Gallery 151, which …

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The Projective Drawing Opening Night Panel Discussion | Austrian Cultural Forum New York

In The Menu, Visual Arts by Gregory De La HabaLeave a Comment

On Monday evening, Quiet Lunch attended the Austrian Cultural Forum New York opening night Panel Discussion for The Projective Drawing, a group exhibition curated by Brett Littman, Executive Director, The Drawing Center, New York. Brett was joined by Elsy Lahner (Albertina, Vienna) and Austrian artists Judith Saupper, Brigitte Mahlknecht and Lionel Favre.  A reception followed afterwards at the Raimund Abraham …

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Film Poetics: Spotlight on Guillermo del Toro

In Film, Marry + Screw + Kill by Alcy LeyvaLeave a Comment

“Film poetics” is a term which runs parallel to the David Bordwell theory of the “historical poetics of cinema” in that it looks at the specifics of film production. Film poetics takes this a step further in stating that everything that goes into a film (set design, writing, lighting, wardrobe) harmonizes with the vision of its director to create one …

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The Big Picture | Faces Places (Review)

In Film, Visual Arts by Jennifer ParkerLeave a Comment

Faces Places is the little documentary that could. Nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature, the filmmakers transform the quotidian into objects of fascination. There’s an inherent narcissism about making a film about the process of making art yet the subjects are so lacking in ego yet charming that it’s a delight to watch. JR and Agnès Varda …

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IG Art of the Week | Pop My Eyes | @popmyeyes

In The Menu, Visual Arts by Quiet LunchLeave a Comment

IG Art of the Week pick is “Book cover by Muriel Roland Darcourt” posted by POPMYEYES. Follow POPMYEYES on Instagram Quiet LunchQuiet Lunch is a grassroot online publication that seeks to promote various aspects of life and culture with a loving, but brute, educational tinge. When we say, “Creative Sustenance Daily,” we mean it. https://quietlunch.com

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Remembering Tim Hunt

In The Menu, Visual Arts by Gregory De La HabaLeave a Comment

Our good friend and drinking companion, Tim Hunt, passed on November 26th, 2017. Always cheerful and dapper in bright, custom-tailored suits, he’d call friends male and female alike, ‘Lovely’ or ‘Darling’. Ever the consummate Englishman, Tim never had a bad word to say about anyone, nor had anyone a bad word to say about Tim, a former Curator at the Andy Warhol Foundation, on …